rabiastravels:

soho, manhattan

rabiastravels:

soho, manhattan

Reblogged from Earthly Creations
Tags: places
  • My brain during the day: Potato, potato, ching chong tomato
  • My brain at night: I wonder why the Earth was placed exactly here and allowed us to provide a perfect climate to sustain human life.
Reblogged from Chicken Vevo
  • me: wow i finally understand math
  • moves on to next question
  • me: what the hell is this
Reblogged from Chicken Vevo
Tags: college

boomsticks-and-firewater:

puellamagidolaon:

lovrdlogic:

When you crack your knuckles you hurt the skeleton inside you

Good, the skeleton needs to know that I am the alpha and I am in control.

Break your own bones to establish dominance over skeleton.

Reblogged from Chicken Vevo

Ōban Star-Racers | 1 x 01 | A Fresh Start

toonmaster:

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Ōban Star-Racers | 1 x 01 | A Fresh Start
PART 5 OF THE GIRL POWER REVIEW SERIES

Every once in a while, there comes along a show that just sweeps you away. Ōban Star-Racers is definitely one of them. It exudes a type of poignancy and ambition that surpasses that of its peers from the Jetix 2006 cycle. 

I remember hearing about the show when it was just a concept, and watching the pitch animation. For months I dreamt in captivation about how the show would turn out. Once it hit the air years later, it became one of my favorites. Even as a kid, I felt that television needed more female leads, and Eva Molly definitely hovered into that role with ease.

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We start the episode with Eva anticipating a birthday phone call from her father, the illustrious racing manager Don Wei. She’s nearly lost hope when she overhears some of her peers chattering about how she’s been stood up. Eva bolts up and scares them away, and then hears about how she has a package for her. The mailman has snuck her the final part she needs for her hovercraft, and with that Eva decides to take off for the city to reunite with her father.

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Eva’s very hopeful, but when she gets to Don Wei’s offices, she’s floored by the absolute lack of enthusiasm for her arrival. The guard laughs at her, and Don Wei shouts at her as if he doesn’t recognize her. Wei presents this hardened, chauvinist attitude that at first jars Eva and leaves her speechless. When she overhears that the mechanics are having an issue with one of the racers, she sneaks over and fixes it, which gets her some attention from her father. Eva can’t bring herself to scream, “I’M YOUR DAUGHTER, YOU IDIOT,” so she glances over at a poster and announces, “I’m Molly!”

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The second part of the episode offers a preface for the Great Race of Ōban, to ensue in later episodes. Called upon by the president, Don Wei gathers his team, which consists of racer Rick Thunderbolt, gunner Jordan C. Wilde and mechanics Stan and Koji. A Crog warrior appears and attempts to sabotage the Earth team. He almost succeeds, but Molly, who refuses to let her dad get away, thrusts him off the freighter with her hovercraft and holds on for dear life.

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Molly’s the kind of girl that you hope to fall in love with, like a certain someone does later on in the show. Nothing keeps her down for long. Whenever her spirits are low, Molly re-energizes and kicks things into high gear. She’s sweet yet rough around the edges, like barbecue sauce with a tangy kick. As far as cartoon characters go, Molly’s one of the most human characters in recent memory. She isn’t played for laughs or pity, and goes through the motions just like any of us would in her shoes. I’m almost moved to say she serves as a template for contemporary characters like Korra.

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Savin Yeatman-Eiffel and his team at Sav! The World deserve a lot of credit for bringing Ōban Star-Racers to fruition without compromising on characters, plot or detail. This is one of the most beautiful animated series in the past decade (which by way of logical conclusion means ‘in all history’), and still measures up to or even exceeds today’s shows in terms of overall quality. Though, with the recent influx of mature, well-animated and well-scripted programs, Ōban Star-Racers is in decent company.

By all means, if you have Netflix, I encourage you to give this show a chance. And, if you’ve already seen it, watch it again!

Reblogged from Toonmaster
scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

Reblogged from ***FLAWLESS
buttart:

there’s so much going on in this gif

buttart:

there’s so much going on in this gif

Reblogged from Chicken Vevo
giggle:

cartel:

giggle:

R U DTF



NO STOP

giggle:

cartel:

giggle:

R U DTF

NO STOP

Reblogged from Chicken Vevo

thecutestofthecute:

sshibe:

living the dream

She’s like some sort of german shepherd princess. Truly inspiring

Reblogged from As the crow flies...

denchgang:

amoyed:

hey where my baes at

image

Reblogged from Trust me, I'm a Doctor
Reblogged from GOODBYE SHOUJO
Tags: NGE